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Q: Refrigerant leak caused by screw tightened too tightly

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Last summer, the air conditioner wasn’t cooling, so the dealership filled the unit with refrigerant. This summer I discovered that the refrigerant had leaked out again! Back to the dealership and this time they added a die when they refilled the unit so that they could find the leak. This is what they found: when the car was built, the screw at the top was tightened too tight and that had caused a small leak which was allowing the refrigerant to leak out. Since this happened when this car was manufactured, I feel they should stand behind both the part and labor, even if it is an older model. They only offered to provide the part. Since this was a manufacturer error, do you know how I can get them to stand behind the labor too?

A: Hi. I checked  the list of recalls for your...

Hi. I checked  the list of recalls for your 1998 Nissan 240SX. Unfortunately, there are no recalls available for your type of AC leak. It will be difficult to get them to pay for it. The only way I see it possibly happening is by you getting some form of documentation from the dealership saying how the car being made the way it is causing the refrigerant to leak out.

Send the documentation expressing your beliefs that it should be covered under warranty to the Nissan North America Center and maybe you will get a good result. I know dealership prices can be outrageous for repair. Alternatively, you could have an independent mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, diagnose and repair the leak for you.

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