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Symptoms of a Bad or Failing Oil Return Hose

Symptoms of a Bad or Failing Oil Return Hose

Having a turbocharged engine will allow you to get far more horsepower when needed and can increase fuel mileage. These turbo systems are very beneficial, but are also more complicated due to the variety of components that they have. In order for the turbo system on your car to work properly, it will need to get oil to properly lubricate the internal parts it has. The turbocharger uses parts that spin at very high speeds and require oil to cool them off. The oil return hose is what supplies the turbo system with the oil it needs. This hose is made of rubber and metal, which makes it very durable but it can fail over time.

There are a variety of things that can happen that will damage the oil return hose. The high heat of the engine is usually one of the main things that will lead to this hose becoming damaged. The hose can fail at crimp locations or the rubber portion can break down over time. Taking the time to inspect this hose on a regular basis will help you to spot any repair issues that are present early on, which will reduce the damage it does to the engine.

1. The rubber on the hose is cracked

Among the most noticeable signs that there is an issue with your oil return hose is the fact that the rubber on the hose is cracked. Over the years, the oil return hose will take a lot of abuse due to the hot and dry conditions that are produced by the engine. Eventually, the rubber on the hose will begin to dry out and crack. Not replacing the hose after these cracks are found will usually lead to a variety of different issues.

2. Bulging spots in the hose

Another very common sign that you will notice when this hose is in need of replacing is bulging spots. These spots are created over time due to the heat of the engine and the constant flow of pressure that this hose experiences. Eventually, the bulging spots will split open and cause the oil inside to leak out.

3. Noticeable oil leaks

When you start to notice that there are puddles of oil underneath your car, then you need to check out the oil return hose. The more oil that you lose form this type of leak, the higher the risk will become of internal engine issues and turbo failure. Acting quickly and getting the hose replaced is the only way to keep your engine safe.

4. Hose o-ring failure

Many hoses use o-rings to seal the mounting locations of the oil return hose. These O-rings can dry out and become brittle over time and use. This can cause oil seeps and leaks where the hose connections are present such as to the turbocharger and engine block.

YourMechanic makes getting repairs to your oil return hose easy by coming to your home or office to diagnose or fix issues. You can book a service online 24/7. YourMechanic’s qualified technicians are also available for any questions that may arise.

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