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Q: power steering is leaking / I have the pump/ pressure hose / belt

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Do I need a return pressure hose and other parts. Motorcraft parts used. There are two other hose .

My car has 225000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Any rubber component on a vehicle system is typically leak prone after about a 6 year lifetime particularly, for example, if you break the seal that a rubber hose in a power steering system makes to a nipple (on pump or reservoir) and then attempt to re-use the hose. It’s just very difficult to get a reliable seal once the hose has already been applied, the outer covering crushed by a clamp and so forth. Even "new" hoses re-applied are a less than optimal circumstance. So, yes, absolutely any low pressure rubber return hose should be replaced as a matter of course in any significant power steering repair. As far as what other parts might be needed, if there are additional rubber pressure hoses and they have significant corrosion on the steel ferrule ends and/or the hoses are original to the vehicle, it’s a good idea to replace them as well (again, rubber products such as hoses have a limited lifetime and hoses will deteriorate on the inside, too, leaving bits of rubber circulating with the power steering fluid) although if these additional hoses are not presently leaking it is "acceptable" to leave them in place. The extent to which you might want to replace worn parts in doing a job like this depends mainly on: 1) how long you intend to keep the car; and 2) the extent to which car repair is a hobby and thus additional "work" or "re-work", if there is further failure, is not necessarily a burden to you. If you intend to keep the car a long time, and you value reliability, it is best to err on the side of caution and, in this circumstance, replace all rubber hoses and make the repair as "complete" as possible. To request that a certified mechanic both diagnosis and repair your leaking power steering system, the services to request are power steering hose replacement and power steering pump replacement.

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