Q: I replaced my starter and my car won't start. I think I did everything correctly, because it did start once.

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I replaced the starter myself. The starter was definitely the issue because they tested the starter I took out of the car and it was bad. I correctly disconnected and the electrical wires before I removed it. The car did start once, but now won't start. I feel like the only logical explanation is some connection/electrical/wire issue. what can I do to fix this, or how much should it cost to diagnose and repair this issue with a professional mechanic?

My car has 230000 miles.
My car has a manual transmission.

Hi Philippe. Thanks for the question today and writing back. If you’d like to request an estimate to have one of our mobile mechanics come to your location and diagnose the root source of this hard starting issue, click this link.

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