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Q: Should I flush previous antifreeze fluid before adding new fluid?

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Hello. I recently bought a new car and I need to fill up my antifreeze/coolant reservoir. So I read the owner's manual and it said to buy the brand Mopar for my car. So I did. But I'm having reservations because I'm not sure what brand is already in there currently from the previous owner (which is like a Purple/lavender color btw) and I'm scared to mix it and mess something up. Should I get it drained and flushed before hand and then put the new fluid in there, or should it be fine and I should just go ahead and add the antifreeze? Thanks in advance!

My car has 23000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

A: The antifreeze in the car now is most likel...

The antifreeze in the car now is most likely the original coolant. When changing your coolant you need to make sure that you are using coolant that meets or exceeds the vehicle specifications. Your cars antifreeze is a special long life antifreeze. The scheduled flush and replace coolant on your vehicle is 5 years or 150,000 miles. Unless you have a cooling system problem you do not need a coolant flush and change for a couple years. If you do need to add any coolant make sure you are using the exact same type OATS type antifreeze made by MOPAR. . Mixing of antifreeze may degrade the antifreeze properties

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