Q: What indicates that the AdvanceTrac® with Roll Stability Control™ is active?

asked by on December 15, 2015

What indicates that the AdvanceTrac® with Roll Stability Control™ is active?

While you shouldn’t notice much when the AdvanceTrac® with Roll Stability Control™ activates, you may feel some sensations depending on what the system is doing and what the driving conditions are. Here’s what you should know:

During Self-Check

The traction control and stability system on your car will conduct a self-check when you first start the engine. It’s normal to hear a grinding or rumbling noise, as well as feel a slight movement in the brake pedal.

Active

When the traction and stability control system activates because of driving conditions, you may notice a number of different things, including the following:

  • Vehicle slows down a little
  • The TCS light on the dash may flash
  • The brake pedal may vibrate
  • The brake pedal may move on its own if you’re not pressing on it and serious driving conditions exist
  • You may hear air from under the gauge cluster (this is normal)
  • You may feel additional stiffness in the brake pedal
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