Q: Q: Overheating

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So i replaced the thermostat and got a brand new radiator because of calcium build up it helped alot but my car is still overheating more than it should be. There is no milky oil and the spark plugs are clean so i have no reason to beleive that i have a broken head gasket
My car has a manual transmission.

The next thing to suspect is the water pump. You have already seen corrosion in the radiator, so you can expect the water pump to be the same. You can test this by removing the water pump bypass hose, a heater hose, or any hose that you think will be flowing coolant when the car is cold. Once a hose is removed, start the car. If it shoots coolant out, then the pump is working. If it doesn’t, rev the motor a bit and see if it shoots water out. If not, you need a water pump. Keep in mind, the amount of flow to expect to see is subjective. It takes experience to know exactly how much flow to expect. If your unsure, you will need to remove the water pump and inspect the impeller.

If you discover the water pump isn’t the problem, the next thing to suspect is the head gasket. You can test this by renting what is known as a block tester from your local auto parts store. Be sure to read the instructions thoroughly before you begin using it. Youtube is a good resource for instruction on this.

If you decide to get some help with this, consider YourMechanic, as a certified technician can help you diagnose your overheating issue and help you figure this out firsthand.

Good luck!

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