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Q: When I went to change the timing belt there were 25 teeth were missing but it didn't jump time - how is this possible?

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Had an 06 Kia spectra come in to the shop with a clicking noise coming from the timing cover started the car twice in the shop and found that the timing belt was missing some teeth did not start it again pulled the timing belt off and found 25 teeth in a row was missing and the engine had not jumped time a single tooth how is this possible

My car has 151000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

A: Not all the teeth need to be present in ord...

Not all the teeth need to be present in order for the pulleys to turn. However, the only way to tell if the cam and crankshaft were really in the right position relative to one another is to line them up before taking the belt off and when the engine is at TDC on cylinder 1. If all the pulleys were lined up to the marks that are embossed on the engine, the only explanation is that the few remaining teeth were stout enough to turn the pulleys without breaking. However, even that doesn’t seem likely, especially since 25 missing teeth in a row would suggest that there weren’t even enough teeth for the belt to fully engage the crankshaft timing gear, thus slippage would have been inevitable. If the 2.0L engine you have has a double overhead cam, that is an interference engine (the single cam version of the 2.0L is a non-interference engine). If you’d like a professional technician check out the engine for damage, due to the failed belt, and/or install the new timing belt, consider YourMechanic.

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