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Q: Warm air blowing out of vents. It's not hot like it should be and it takes a very long time to get warm

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Warm air blowing out of vents. It's not hot like it should be and it takes a very long time to get warm My car has 244672 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Hi, thanks for writing in. Generally speaking, if a vehicle is taking a long time to get to operating temperature you have a thermostat that is stuck open. You can replace it and it will fix your problem. Also, if your heater core is clogged or leaking you will experience issues such as the ones you have mentioned. If this is the case you’ll need to have your heater core flushed or replaced.

If you would like help, consider having an expert automotive technician from YourMechanic come to your home or office to inspect and diagnose this issue for you, and make or suggest any repairs as needed.

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