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Q: Do I need to replace camseals when doing timing belt job?

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I just had my timing belt replaced. When I saw online, it said recommended to do the camseals when doing timing belt, but the mechanic told me that it is not necessary if it is not leaking and that usually camseals don't start leaking (last a long time). Is this true?
My car's mileage is 92000 miles.
My car's transmission is automatic

A: More likely than not, your camshaft seals a...

More likely than not, your camshaft seals are not leaking. They should still be holding up as long as you have kept up with changing the engine oil. However, it is recommended to have these seals replaced regardless of a leak in the event of an actual leak starting after a timing belt service. In this case, the full labor plus more to replace the seals is expected to be paid the next time around, as the seals are located behind all of the same components as the timing belt.

Yes, these seals do "last a long time". As does the water pump which is another recommended part to be replaced with the timing belt tensioner. Of course, replacing the belt alone completes the service, but having all new parts offers a sense of security. To save some money and avoid a headache, it is recommended that you replace the camshaft seals along with the timing belt, water pump, timing belt tensioner, and timing belt drive pulleys. Most of these components are found in the average timing belt kit. Consider YourMechanic the next time around and have one of our expert mechanics take care of your car.

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