Skip the auto shop - Our mechanics make house calls

Q: What's the cost of ownership for an Audi?

asked by on

I'm am currently car shopping and I am very interested in a audi I'm am looking at however I have heard a lot of horror stories when it comes to repair cost. I have never owned a German luxury vehicle before however with ownership I am aware that it cost more to maintain than a Honda. I just want a esitmate on how much a year I can expect to spend on the car a year. It will be my main vehicle and I get a lot of driving done. Something like 10k miles a year so I need to know what type of cost facing to make the decision. The vehicle is pre certified so its already mechanically sound.

My car has 94000 miles.
My car has a manual transmission.

A: Unfortunately it is not easy to predict wha...

Unfortunately it is not easy to predict what any car will cost to maintain. Problems can pop up even with vehicles that have reputations for great reliability just as easily as "luxury" brands that may not be well known for reliability. One thing that I can say with certainty is that other than routine maintenance not being much more than any other car, because of the brand, when things do break or fail, odds are they will be expensive, at least from a parts standpoint. The 2.0T is specified to use synthetic oil so that should be considered. Many have experienced oil consumption with this engine as well. With few exceptions, the industry standard is 1 quart per 1,000 miles consumed is deemed "acceptable" oil consumption. Having owned German cars as well as having worked in the service departments of a few German makes - Audi included - I personally feel the maintenance schedule of changing the oil once a year or 10,000 miles is a bit too long of an interval. This sometimes leads people to not even check the oil level between services.

Not claiming that any manufacturer's recommendations are incorrect, I always follow my own schedule for a long healthy life with my cars. My recommendations: change the oil every 6 months or 5,000 miles with the recommended synthetic oil. Change the coolant and brake fluid every two years regardless of mileage. Coolant deteriorates over time and can also "gel" up and clog small coolant passages. Brake fluid is hydroscopic - it absorbs moisture - which can reduce it's boiling point. Flushing the brake fluid regularly also helps extend the life of the anti-lock brake pump which can be expensive to replace. Changing the brake fluid regularly is cheap insurance for that. Also, change the spark plugs every 40,000 miles. At the very least, follow the manufacturer's recommendations for maintaining any vehicle.

Some advice on a long healthy life with your vehicle can be found [here](https://www.yourmechanic.com/article/top-10-ways-to-extend-the-life-of-your-car0.

Was this answer helpful?

Need advice from certified mechanic? Get help now!

Over 1000 mechanics are ready to answer your question.
The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

Get an instant quote for your car

Our certified mechanics come to you ・Backed by 12-month, 12,000-mile guarantee・Save up to 30%

Get a quote

What others are asking

Q: Bank 1 running to rich and injector 1 contribution fault Intermittent.

Hi and thanks for contacting YourMechanic. What you are experiencing is a misfire detected in cylinder 1 and a random misfire in cylinder 3. This could be caused by either the fuel injectors not firing, the spark plugs fouling out,...

Q: Car stalls after starting

The symptoms you have described have quite a few different causes. Common causes of this could be the MAF sensor, torque converter locked up, fuel pump failing, ignition switch, or fuel injector failure. Not all of these will trigger the...

Q: Coolant level dropping quickly 2006 Saab 9-3

Hi there - yes, I would say this is a problem. Coolant loss can be deceptive - failing water pumps will sometimes only leak while running, blown head gaskets can leak into the engine crankcase, turning the engine oil to...

Related articles

P0240 OBD-II Trouble Code: Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance
P0240 code definition Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance What the P0240 code means P0240 is an OBD-II generic code triggered when the Engine Control Module (ECM) detects the intake boost...
Rules of the Road For Iowa Drivers
Driving on the roads requires knowledge of the rules, many of which are based on common sense and courtesy. However, even though you know the rules in...
How to Avoid Back Pain in a Car
If you have back problems, sitting in a car for an extended period of time can be excruciating. Even without back problems, you could experience discomfort and soreness from...