Q: Van stalled after filling gas tank which had been low in fuel (on red line but no light) and then it was OK about 15 minutes later

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This is the original fuel pump. Is this an early sign that the fuel pump should be replaced? Van had not been used for past three days and it sat in the very cold below zero temperatures that we had in Milwaukee. Family all piled in to drive to Kenosha, WI for a family gathering on Christmas. This is my wife's car. I noticed we needed gas and drove to gas station about two miles away, so engine did not warm up that much. Filled gas tank full and as soon as we pulled out I noticed the van chugging and watched the tachometer as it went up and down by itself. It finally had no power at all but did not shut off. I pulled over and shut it off. The oil light had come on. I checked all fuel levels and serpentine belt; all good. Started it up and same thing; pushed on gas and no power, engine shut off. Waited 15 minutes and all was good. But, I did not want to take a chance so we drove it home and took different vehicle. Should I replace the fuel pump at $500 installed cost?

My car has 144000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Hi There, This is likely related to your EVAP emissions system and something called a purge solenoid. The EVAP system prevents fuel vapors from the fuel tank from escaping into the atmosphere. The EVAP system collects and temporarily stores the fuel vapors in a small charcoal canister. This charcoal canister is filled with activated carbon pellets that are designed to absorb the fuel vapors. When the engine is running, the fuel vapors are purged from the canister and burned in the engine. The vent control valve (solenoid) controls the flow of outside air in and out of the charcoal canister. When this is not working properly, you may experience the gas pump shutting off prematurely causing it to take a very long time to fill up your fuel tank. This is due to the excess fuel vapor that is present when the purge solenoid is not working properly by releasing these vapors. The gas pumps at the fuel station have automatic sensors on them (for safety reasons) that shut off automatically when too much fuel vapor is present. When an air leak is present in the EVAP system, the MAP sensor will not be able to determine the air density, and the MAF sensor will not be able to determine the volume of air, entering the engine correctly. This will lead to an over fueling situation or an under fueling situation depending on the size of the air leak and engine operating speeds and load. This may eventually lead to catalytic converter problems as well as misfiring and starting problems. I would recommend having an expert from Your Mechanic come to your location to diagnose and inspect your vehicle. I would recommend having an expert from Your Mechanic come to your home to take a look at your car to diagnose your EVAP purge solenoid.

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