Skip the auto shop - Our mechanics make house calls

Q: Transmission is not smooth at all, any service that will help?

asked by on

My 2006 Honda Odyssey has a problem with the transmission that causes the whole car to shudder when it changes gear. On the higher gear changes the car feels alright, just a little rumble. At low speeds it’s a noticeable shudder and it clunks into gear. I am really worried that this transmission is totally screwed and now, at 101,000 miles, I am going to be stuck paying for it all out of pocket. Is there anything I can do to put off the imminent transmission failure?

A: We must start by pointing out that this 200...

We must start by pointing out that this 2006 Honda Odyssey has 101,000 miles on its transmission and the problem might be from internal component wear. At that mileage, no manufacturer would provide any assistance for any repairs, unless it is a recall (most of the time a safety issue). There is history of the Honda Odyssey having problems with the torque converter lock-up clutch causing a judder to be felt while driving 20-60 mph. It was addressed on TSB (Technical Service Bulletin) 12-009 with a PCM (Power Control Module) update to minimize judder occurrence. They did not provide any assistance for anything more then the PCM update. The next recommendation is replacing the torque converter, but most of the time, the mileage is around 50,000-60,000 miles on those vehicles. Your local mechanic, such as YourMechanic can check your transmission to see whether it is a computer update, torque converter, or internal transmission wear issue. If the issue is internal transmission wear, it’s best to replace your transmission altogether.

Was this answer helpful?

Need advice from certified mechanic? Get help now!

Over 1000 mechanics are ready to answer your question.
The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

Ask a Mechanic
(100% Free)

Have a car question? Get free advice from our top-rated mechanics.

Ask A Mechanic
Over 10,000 questions answered!

Get an instant quote for your car

Our certified mechanics come to you ・Backed by 12-month, 12,000-mile guarantee・Fair and transparent pricing

Get a quote

What others are asking

Q: Hesitation

Hi there: In most cases, engine hesitation or stumbling is caused by fuel system or ignition system component failures; such as mass air flow sensors, O2 sensors or problems with ignition control modules. However, in some rare cases, oil lubrication...

Q: When at idle and accelerating, my 2006 Chevy Silverado 5.3 4x4 is making a humming sound 2006 Chevrolet Silverado

Hi there - although the actual heater control valve is vacuum operated, it is electronically (solenoid) controlled. It is possible the hum is from one of the HVAC control solenoids, or other parts of the coolant flow control. I would...

Q: How bad is it for the car if when I accelerate i let it go to higher rpms like 4 or 5?

Hi there: On a four cylinder or small six cylinder engine, accelerating the engine past 4,000 RPM on a consistent basis is not a good idea. The power band on lower gears tops out around the 4,500 to 5,000 RPM...

Related articles

P0240 OBD-II Trouble Code: Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance
P0240 code definition Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance What the P0240 code means P0240 is an OBD-II generic code triggered when the Engine Control Module (ECM) detects the intake boost...
Rules of the Road For Iowa Drivers
Driving on the roads requires knowledge of the rules, many of which are based on common sense and courtesy. However, even though you know the rules in...
How to Avoid Back Pain in a Car
If you have back problems, sitting in a car for an extended period of time can be excruciating. Even without back problems, you could experience discomfort and soreness from...