Q: Tires making whining noise.

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I might need to replace the front bearings, bushings, and tie rods. The tires are making a weird whining noise.

The tread wall of the tires need to be checked for abnormal wear. Inspect the tires to ensure no steel chords are exposed on the tire. Run your hand across the inner and outer edges of each tire to see if a cupping or chopping pattern is worn in the tread. If there is then it would indicate possible worn or bent suspension components. These issues would have to be repaired and the tires replaced to get rid of the noise. A vehicle alignment may be necessary to ensure new tires are not prematurely worn and the issue returns. If the noise is a growling noise and no abnormal tire wear is evident, then taking the vehicle to a safe open area to test drive will be necessary. Drive the vehicle to the slowest speed the noise can be heard and then safely move the steering wheel to the left and right to shift the vehicle’s weight from side to side. Listen for sound change while doing this. The side on which the noise is more noticeable when the vehicle weight is shifted would indicate a wheel bearing issue. You may want to enlist the help of a mechanic who can accurately diagnose the noise source and recommend/carry out necessary repairs.

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