Q: There is a wire at the bottom of the A/C fan that is not connected to anything. What is this wire?

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There is a wire at the bottom of a/c fan that is not connected to anything
My car has an automatic transmission.

I assume this is a wire with a connector on the end, if not, then a loose wire with out an end is part of a damaged harness. If this is the case, I will not be able to tell you what the wire goes to. If it is what I suspect, a connector with nothing connected to it, then this would most likely be normal. If the car runs normally, it doesn’t overheat and has not had any recent work done, this is simply a connector the manufacturer did not use.

Manufacturers build wiring harnesses that will fit all their cars. It’s simpler to build a bunch of the same harnesses than a different harness for each car with different accessories. This is why it is very common for connectors to be present with nothing attached to them.

If you just finished repairing your own car, and are certain it went somewhere, I suggest looking at the connector from a different perspective. Say, lay on you back and look around under the car from there. As a technician, it is common to put a car back together and be left wondering what was connected to that. Changing my perspective has been my go to method to discover what plugs into it. If you just had your car worked on my someone, return to them and ask.

If everything works correctly, and you haven’t had any recent work done, that connector will be normal. However, if you notice any issues or want a fresh pair of eyes on this, consider YourMechanic as a certified technician can diagnose your A/C and help pinpoint the use of the wire in person.

Good luck!

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