Q: How do I tell what size lug nuts I need for my rims?

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So I was looking for rims for my car and found ones that I liked. My rims have a 4 bolt pattern and these other rims have an 8 bolt pattern. I was wondering what the lug nut size for my rims are? The person I might by the rims from said that the lug nut size are either 4x100 or 8x100. I don't know what that means so that's why I'm asking.

My car has 143675 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

The lug nut bolt pattern on your vehicle is 4 x 114.3. In practical terms, that means that an imaginary circle drawn through the four "bolt holes" will have a diameter of 114.3 millimeters. Of course, a bolt pattern designated "4 x 100" (100 millimeter diameter) will not work on your car because none of the bolt holes will line up.

Please note that certain wheels, even with the "same" bolt hole pattern as your original wheels, will not work properly or safely on your car due to differences in another critical wheel dimension, which is offset. Your OEM factory wheels have high positive offset and ideally any substitute wheel you are thinking of should have the identical amount of offset.

There are quite a few (dimensional) variables to consider when replacing wheels. Consequently, it is optimal to replace the wheels on your car with exact factory duplicates to avoid problems with handling and steering, interference (and consequent damage to the wheel wells) and premature wear-out of your car’s suspension. YourMechanic can help you with wise wheel and tire wheel selection, installation, and regular maintenance such as a tire rotation which is really critical because regular rotation, every 6,000 miles, will greatly extend the service life of your tires.

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