Q: Horrible grinding sound after recently replaced front and back brakes and rotors.

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My husband replaced our front and rear brake pads and rotors a couple of months ago. After the replacement there has been such a horrible grinding noise any time we brake, especially when we brake gradually. He took the front brake pads off and put anti seize lubricant on the back of the rotors and put more between the calipers and the brake pads. That stopped in for a couple days, and now the sound is back. We don't know if it is now just coming from the back or if it both the front and back. I don't want to ruin anything by letting this continue, plus it is extremely annoying. Can you give us any other advice on what this grinding noise can be? Thank you!

My car has 55600 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Hi there. Were there shims installed on the old pads? New shims on the new pads? Missing shims can create noise while braking which is why the antiseize worked for a short time. What brand/level of brake pads did your husband install? Usually, the lowest priced pads are the noisiest. The antisieze that he installed is not recommended to be put on brake components as the high temperatures of these parts can cause the lubricant to run and contaminate the pads and rotors. There are specifically designed brake pad shim lubricants designed to withstand these high temperatures; these are the only ones that should be used if needed. I strongly suggest having a qualified technician perform an inspection to avoid replacing unnecessary parts and a possible safety concern. Your Mechanic has several available technicians that can assist you with a brakes are making a noise inspection.

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