Q: hey jose ,my name is larry , i took my car to the mechinc they the check engine light was on ,its the upstream bank 2 sensor ,do i

asked by on

my upstream bank 2 sensor needs to be replaced ,that's what the computer says ,but what I want to know is, do we need to replace both ,even if just the upper shows on the computer

My car has 60000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Diagnostic Trouble Codes cannot be used to "directly" condemn parts. In the case of an oxygen sensor, the oxygen sensor output has to be evaluated on a scope to determine if the sensor itself is bad OR if you perhaps have a situation where there is loose wire or other fault in the circuit (or even a fault in another engine system). If the Mechanic did not evaluate the sensor output on an automotive scope, he or she is just guessing that the sensor needs to be replaced. If guessing, of course they may guess right or they may guess wrong. If the diagnostic was done, and the sensor is out of spec. then it should be replaced. As far as the other sensor is concerned, the exact same technical instructions apply. If the output of the other sensor was tested and it tests bad, replace it. If it tests good, keep it. If it was not tested, then you have no information upon which to make a decision. Before you do anything, ask the Mechanic, "did you look at the sensor output on a appropriate automotive scope and, if so, what was the result of that exam?". Alternatively, if you desire that this problem be diagnosed by a certified Mechanic, dispatched by YourMechanic right to your location, please request a check engine light diagnostic and the responding certified mechanic will get this resolved for you. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you.

Was this answer helpful?

Need advice from certified mechanic? Get help now!

Over 1,000 mechanics are ready to answer your question.
The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

Ask a Mechanic
(100% Free)

Have a car question? Get free advice from our top-rated mechanics.

Ask A Mechanic
Over 10,000 questions answered!
  1. Home
  2. Questions
  3. hey jose ,my name is larry , i took my car to the mechinc they the check engine light was on ,its the upstream bank 2 sensor ,do i

Get an instant quote for your car

Our certified mechanics come to you ・Backed by 12-month, 12,000-mile guarantee・Fair and transparent pricing

Get a quote

What others are asking

Q: Engine Light and AT light. Car goes into limp mode

Hello. Most of the time this is the result of a transmission failure. It is common for this transmission to have internal pressure problem which will cause these codes. It can also be a voltage problem so I always check...

Q: Had Oxygen sensor replaced twice by different shops. Still get this code intermitently.

Hello. A technician will have to diagnose your vehicle to see exactly which wiring is at fault. There are other things which can cause an oxygen sensor check engine light such as a vacuum leak or a bad catalytic converter....

Q: Multiple problems with a used car.

You most likely have two bad front window regulators. The front rotors are most likely warped and would need replacement. You could have a mechanic like one from Your Mechanic come to you and check all the issues are having...

Related articles

How Do Power Car Windows Increase Passenger Safety?
Power windows are responsible for approximately 2,000 emergency room visits every year. When a power window closes, it exerts enough force to bruise or break bones, crush fingers, or restrict an airway. Though...
What are the Car Pool Rules in Hawaii?
Hawaii is widely regarded as a land of vacation and relaxation, and as such, its scenic roads and routes are far better known than the state’s freeways. But, as with all...
P2103 OBD-II Trouble Code: Throttle Actuator Control Motor Circuit High
P2103 means there is a fault with the throttle actuator control motor circuit, likely due to a defective electrical component or part.