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Q: Engine stalls out for no reason, what’s wrong?

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My 2008 Ford Edge has always had a problem with randomly stalling. I thought this was pretty odd for an automatic vehicle, but the incidents were not frequent at all. Now, at just 45,000 miles, the problem has progressed to the point where it is stalling out at full speed. This is downright dangerous now and I need a solution! What can I do to find out what’s even wrong?

There a number of things that can cause your vehicle to have this problem. Possible problems include a faulty Mass Airflow Sensor, a Crankshaft Position Sensor, and the Loss of fuel pressure. Intermittent problems can take more time to isolate because the problem needs to be in effect in order to best locate the it. Diagnosis is particularly dependent on this when no trouble codes are present. Even so, other tests can be performed that might reveal possible causes. Voltages and range tests can be performed on suspected components to determine if they are within tolerances, monitoring fuel pressure while test driving can confirm if it remains within specs. Diagnostic scan tools with the ability to monitor live data can also be used. Such test are not guaranteed to pinpoint the problem if it isn’t exhibiting the fault, but often enough they can. It is important to be proactive in finding a solution, as opposed to waiting for the next time it stalls while you are driving. Qualified auto technicians at YourMechanic can do this for you.

A certified mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, can diagnose the repetitive stalling and perform any necessary repairs.

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