Skip the auto shop - Our mechanics make house calls

Q: All of my lights went out at once

asked by on

All of my lights went out at once, I have no brake lights, no head lights, no tail lights, and no inside lights, but my signal lights work. What's wrong?
My car has an automatic transmission.

A: Hi, thanks for writing in. When it comes to...

Hi, thanks for writing in. When it comes to electrical issues like this one, the problem can come from many components. While it is possible that all of the light bulbs would go out at once, it is highly unlikely. Have you tried to replace one of them and see what happens? There could also be a short in the system where all of those components meet. This is likely at the fuse box. The power supply from the battery is routed to the main fuse box where the voltage is run to the separate electrical loads (bulbs). Check all fuses for related circuits and make sure they are allowing the power to pass through them. You can use a voltmeter to trace the power supply to each socket and bulb. If you have voltage available at the socket, you can skip tracing it from the fuse box. If not, its recommended you trace the voltage from the source. If you would like help, consider having an expert automotive technician from YourMechanic come to your home or office to inspect and diagnose this electrical issue for you, and make or suggest any repairs as needed.

Was this answer helpful?

Need advice from certified mechanic? Get help now!

Over 1000 mechanics are ready to answer your question.
The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

Ask a Mechanic
(100% Free)

Have a car question? Get free advice from our top-rated mechanics.

Ask A Mechanic
Over 10,000 questions answered!

Get an instant quote for your car

Our certified mechanics come to you ・Backed by 12-month, 12,000-mile guarantee・Save up to 30%

Get a quote

What others are asking

Q: Is there any way to change the headlight bulb more easily?

Engineers do not seem to think about anyone servicing the cars after they design them, and in your situation there is no way around getting access to the headlight bulbs. The bulbs in your car are Halogen style and do...

Q: Keep blowing a tail light fuse.

Assuming that no wiring was damaged during the install of the aftermarket lights, (i.e., cut insulation causing a short to ground), if the fuse started blowing right after the install that means the LED assembly is drawing more current than...

Q: Where is the interior dome light fuse located

I did some research and found that the interior dome light is actually controlled by the fuse labeled CTS-PWR-LK. Forums are indicating that this is the number #35 fuse, but you can verify it by checking the fuse panel. If...

Related articles

How Long Does a Heater Control Valve Last?
Keeping the right amount of coolant in a car is essential in keeping the engine at the right temperature. Failing to have the right amount of coolant or even bad elements...
P0052 OBD-II Trouble Code: HO2S Heater Control Circuit High (Bank 2 Sensor 1)
P0052 code definition HO2S Heater Control Circuit High (Bank 2 Sensor 1) What the P0052 code means This code is seen when the Engine Control Module (ECM) tries to control the...
P2428 OBD-II Trouble Code: Exhaust Gas Temperature Too High Bank 1
P2428 code definition A P2428 trouble code signifies that the PCM has detected a problem in the exhaust gas temperature sensor circuit in bank 1, which subsequently contains the number one...