Q: Advice on buying a 1997 Volvo S70 with 190,000 miles

asked by on

I'm thinking about buying a 1997 Volvo S70. It has 190,000 miles and I'm hoping good oil. Transmission fluid seems clean and the timing belts were recently repaired. He only wants 1800. Is it worth it?

If it’s a running car and it runs good--that’s what that car probably would go for. I personally wouldn’t buy an S70 because I work on them for a living. I’ve worked on quite a few of them and they all became super expensive as they got to be that age.

Generally, the transmissions go out, which can cost anywhere from 3500 to 5500 bucks to repair. The engines are pretty good though and the electronics are haywire and the air conditioning systems are terrible. Here in Texas, they break all the time if you don’t care about the AC. But 1800 bucks isn’t much for a car. If it runs good and you like it, you might take a gamble and lose that 1800 dollars. I would have a qualified mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, come out to the location of the vehicle and give the car a pre-purchase inspection, so that you can get a more detailed evaluation of the car’s condition.

Was this answer helpful?

Need advice from certified mechanic? Get help now!

Over 1,000 mechanics are ready to answer your question.
The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

Ask a Mechanic
(100% Free)

Have a car question? Get free advice from our top-rated mechanics.

Ask A Mechanic
Over 10,000 questions answered!
  1. Home
  2. Questions
  3. Advice on buying a 1997 Volvo S70 with 190,000 miles

Get an instant quote for your car

Our certified mechanics come to you ・Backed by 12-month, 12,000-mile guarantee・Fair and transparent pricing

Get a quote

What others are asking

Q: What could cause check engine light and transmission service message to display on when weather is over 100 degrees?

Hi There, A number of sensors may become faulty in hot weather conditions which will ultimately cause the check engine light to come on. As the weather gets hotter, many sensors, fuel injectors and other components such as ignition coils...

Q: Wanted to ask , if I need to replace the compressor on 2001 lincoln ls ?

Hello. A compressor that does not engage can be caused by many things besides a faulty compressor. The compressor is controlled by a clutch cycling or AC pressure switch that will tell the compressor when to turn on and off....

Q: Oil pan came off

It is highly unlikely that your oil pan came off. It is possible that it may have a hole in it due to some road debris, or perhaps the oil filter may have come loose slightly causing oil to leak...

Related articles

How Do Power Car Windows Increase Passenger Safety?
Power windows are responsible for approximately 2,000 emergency room visits every year. When a power window closes, it exerts enough force to bruise or break bones, crush fingers, or restrict an airway. Though...
P0240 OBD-II Trouble Code: Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance
P0240 code definition Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance What the P0240 code means P0240 is an OBD-II generic code triggered when the Engine Control Module (ECM) detects the intake boost...
P2103 OBD-II Trouble Code: Throttle Actuator Control Motor Circuit High
P2103 means there is a fault with the throttle actuator control motor circuit, likely due to a defective electrical component or part.