The Guide To Colored Curb Zones in Vermont

The Guide to Colored Curb Zones in Vermont

Vermont parking laws: understanding the basics

Drivers in Vermont need to pay careful attention to where they park their vehicles. It is just as important to know the regulations and laws about parking as it is to know all of the laws that apply when you are actually driving. Those who do not pay attention to the parking laws are at risk of getting fines and even having their car towed. Let’s look at some of the most important parking laws to remember in Vermont. Also, keep in mind that in some towns and cities, the actual parking laws can vary somewhat. Learn the laws for where you live.

Parking regulations to remember

When you are parking, your vehicle needs to be facing the same direction as the flow of traffic. In addition, you need to make sure that your wheels are no more than 12 inches from the curb. If you have to park on the highway in a rural area, you need to make sure all of your wheels are off of the travel portion of the road, and that drivers in both directions can see your vehicle for 150 feet in either direction.

There are a number of places where you are not allowed to park. You cannot park beside a vehicle that is already stopped or parked on the street. This is called double parking, and it is going to slow down traffic, not to mention it is a hazard. Drivers are not allowed to park in intersections, crosswalks, or on sidewalks.

If there is any type of road work going on, you cannot park near it or on the opposite side of the street from it, as it could cause traffic to slow down. You cannot park in tunnels, bridges, or on railroad tracks. In fact, you have to be at least 50 feet away from the nearest rail of a railroad crossing when parking.

It is also unlawful to park in front of a driveway. If you parked there, it could prevent people from going into and out of the driveway, which would be a huge inconvenience. Many times, property owners will have vehicles towed away when they block driveways.

When parking, you need to be at least six feet away from any fire hydrant and at least 20 feet away from a crosswalk at an intersection. You have to park at least 30 feet away from traffic lights, stop signs, or flashing signals. If you are parking on the same side of the street as a fire station entrance, you need to stay at least 20 feet from the entrance. If you are parking on the other side of the street, you will need to be at least 75 feet away from the entrance. Do not park in bike lanes, and never park in a handicapped space unless you have the required plates and placards.

When you are getting ready to park, you should always look for any signs in the area. Official signage can let you know whether you are allowed to park in the location or not, so you should follow these signs.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

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