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P2011 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Control Circuit Open Bank 2

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P2011 trouble code definition

The P2011 diagnostic trouble code indicates that the intake manifold runner control (IMRC) circuit in open in bank 2.

Related Trouble Codes:

P2004 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Ctrl Stuck Open Bank 1
P2005 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Ctrl Stuck Open Bank
P2006 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Ctrl Stuck Closed Bank 1
P2007 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Ctrl Stuck Closed Bank 2
P2008 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Control Circuit Open Bank 1
P2009 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Control Circuit Low Bank 1
P2010 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Control Circuit High Bank 1
P2012 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Control Circuit Low Bank 2
P2013 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Control Circuit High Bank 2
P2014 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Pos Sensor/Switch Circ Bank 1
P2015 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Pos Sensor/Switch Circ Range/Perf Bank 1
P2016 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Pos Sensor/Switch Circ Low Bank 1
P2017 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Pos Sensor/Switch Circ High Bank 1
P2018 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Pos Sensor/Switch Circ Interm Bank 1
P2019 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Pos Sensor/Switch Circ Bank 2
P2020 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Pos Sensor/Switch Cir Range/Perf Bank 2
P2021 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Pos Sensor/Switch Circ Low Bank 2
P2022 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Pos Sensor/Switch Circ High Bank 2
P2023 OBD-II Trouble Code: Intake Manifold Runner Pos Sensor/Switch Circ Interm Bank 2

What the P2011 code means

The Intake Manifold Runner Control (IMRC) improves an engine’s fuel/air mixture by regulating the amount of airflow allowed into the intake system. The IMRC does this by using information provided by the powertrain control module (PCM) related to current driving conditions. The IMRC increases fuel economy by improving the air/fuel mixture, and reduces harmful emissions.

The IMRC has several components, which include: a vacuum actuator, electric solenoid, butterfly valve plates, air passageways to each cylinder, linkage rods connected to the intake manifold butterfly plate lever, and return springs that hold the butterfly valve plates open.

Airflow is permitted or restricted from entering the intake system by butterfly valve plates that open and close depending on current driving conditions. The IMRC solenoid, mass airflow sensor, and barometric sensor send information to the powertrain control module (PCM), which then determines the proper position of the IMRC butterfly valve plates.

The IMRC butterfly valve plates will open when speed and revolutions per minute (RPM) are high, and close when speed and revolutions per minute (RPM) are low.

If the powertrain control module (PCM) detects voltage reading from the IMRC solenoid, mass airflow sensor, and/or barometric sensor that indicate the intake manifold runner control butterfly valve plates are not in the proper position, the P2011 diagnostic trouble code will be stored by the powertrain control module.

What causes the P2011 code?

  • Intake Manifold Runner Control (IMRC) solenoid is defective.

  • IMRC solenoid wiring that has shorts, breaks, or is frayed.

  • IMRC solenoid circuitry that has shorted or is open.

  • IMRC solenoid connector is corroded.

  • IMRC butterfly valve plate screws are loose or broken.

  • IMRC butterfly valve plates are broken.

  • IMRC butterfly valves plates that have disconnected from the IMRC actuator.

  • Vacuum control solenoid vacuum filter that is clogged.

  • Debris in the vacuum control solenoid.

  • Vacuum lines that are disconnected or broken.

  • Carbon buildup on the IMRC butterfly valve plates

  • EGR valve diagnostic trouble codes that have been stored by the PCM

  • Mass airflow sensor diagnostic trouble codes that have been stored by the PCM

  • Barometric sensor diagnostic trouble codes that have been stored by the PCM

What are the symptoms of the P2011 code?

  • Decrease in fuel economy
  • Decrease in low end engine torque
  • The engine may surge/sputter
  • The vehicle will run rough
  • Check Engine Light illuminating on
  • Check Engine Light light flashing

How does a mechanic diagnose the P2011 code?

  • Use an OBD-II scanner to collect freeze frame data and any trouble codes that have been stored by the PCM.

  • Complete a visual inspection of all wiring for shorts, breaks, and frays.

  • If any of the wiring has shorted, is frayed, or broken, repair or replace as necessary.

  • Complete a visual inspection of the IMRC solenoid for corrosion and damage.

  • If any of the connectors are corroded or damaged, repair or replace as necessary.

  • Inspect the vacuum lines and hoses.

  • If any of the vacuum lines or hoses are loose or damaged, repair or replace as necessary.

  • Inspect the IMRC butterfly valve plates for proper connection and/or breaks.

  • Inspect the EGR valve for excessive carbon buildup. This carbon buildup could get onto the IMRC solenoid and render it defective.

  • If trouble codes for the EGR valve, mass airflow sensor, and/or barometric sensor have been stored by the PCM, they should be diagnosed and repaired first.

  • Clear the codes and retest to see if the P2011 diagnostic trouble code returns.

  • Use the scan tool to test the IMRC solenoid. Open and close the IMRC solenoid using the scanner. If the IMRC solenoid does not respond, the solenoid will need to be replaced.

Common mistakes when diagnosing the P2011 code

  • Misdiagnosing and replacing the IMRC solenoid

  • Misdiagnosing and replacing the IMRC butterfly valve plates

  • Overlooking damaged or disconnected vacuum lines

  • Overlooking IMRC solenoid connector and wiring

  • Replacing the IMRC butterfly valve plates when the problem was that they were not connected properly.

  • Neglecting to diagnose and repair other EGR valve, mass airflow sensor, and/or barometric diagnostic trouble codes before making any repairs for the P2011 diagnostic trouble code.

How serious is the P2011 code?

The P2011 diagnostic trouble code is most commonly considered moderately serious. However, this diagnostic trouble code can be potentially a serious one if the hardware for the IMRC butterfly valve plates becomes loose and falls into the engine. If this happens, it may cause severe internal engine damage. Therefore, the P2011 diagnostic trouble could should be addressed as soon as possible.

What repairs can fix the P2011 code?

  • Replace the IMRC solenoid.

  • Repair or replace IMRC solenoid wiring that is has shorts, breaks or is frayed.

  • Repair or replace IMRC solenoid circuitry that has shorted or is open.

  • Repair or replace IMRC solenoid connector that is corroded.

  • Repair and/or replace IMRC butterfly valve plate hardware, if necessary.

  • Repair or replace loose or damaged vacuum lines.

  • Replace IMRC butterfly valve plates. In order to do this, the intake manifold assembly will need to be replaced.

  • If EGR valve, mass airflow sensor, and/or barometric diagnostic trouble codes are present, diagnose and repair.

Additional comments for consideration regarding the P2011 code

It is common for the IMRC butterfly valve plates to detach from the IMRC actuator, which will cause the PCM to store the P2011 diagnostic trouble code.

It is important to check the connection of the IMRC butterfly valve plates to the IMRC actuator, as this could be a very quick fix to resolve the problem.

Another common cause for the P2011 diagnostic trouble code is the IMRC butterfly valve plates to be stuck as a result of carbon buildup in the intake, which is often seen in vehicles with a higher mileage.

Need help with a P2011 code?

YourMechanic offers certified mechanics who will come to your home or office to diagnose and repair your vehicle. Get a quote and book an appointment online or speak to a service advisor at 1-800-701-6230.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
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