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Q: Vehicle burning oil

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My truck burns oil, but it does not leak oil. When I accelerate, I hear a crackling noise from the engine. I suspect that it might need the intake manifold gasket and plenum gasket. Also, it does not smoke. Your input would be appreciated on this matter. Thank you!

My car has 125000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Hey there. Every vehicle will begin to burn oil as it ages. It is completely normal and expected. Most likely, there is an oil leak somewhere on the motor that just doesn’t reach the ground in the form of a drip. Oil and coolant can leak slow enough that it will evaporate before it is noticeable without a thorough inspection from underneath, in front of and behind the motor. And then there is oil that finds its way past he rings and into the cylinders, which is a completely normal and engineered part of the rings sealing in the cylinders during combustion. The combination of the two of these oil leaks can be found on virtually every older vehicle on the road. When I say older, I speak of anything more than ten years old.

If you don’t see any oil leaking on the ground, then it isn’t something to worry about. Just know that oil leaks of this nature will contribute to oil usage. When it comes to burning oil, it depends on how much oil it burns between oil changes. The general rule of thumb is a quart of oil between an oil change interval of three or four thousands miles is acceptable. My own vehicle uses a little over a quart of oil between oil changes.

If you find yourself adding several quarts in a three thousand mile period or it smokes out the tail pipe, then its time to consider an engine build. I have personally seen vehicles last decades in this state. So depending on how much oil is lost between oil changes, I would’t be to worried.

If you require further assistance with this, I recommend having an inspection of the low oil levels so that this can be correctly addressed.

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