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Q: The camshaft in our Honda Odyssey 2006 is worn out and the car has been making a ticking noise

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We have had our Honda odyssey looked at due to a constant ticking noise, the mechanic said that the camshaft was worn out and needed replacing he said it was a very expensive job to the point that it would be better to trade in. We like our car and we are still paying it off. He quoted 4,000_5000. Would this be right? He said he wouldn't replace the engine either. Please advise thank you.

My car has 260000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Hi - that amount seems rather excessive, and perhaps the mechanic is telling you "I don’t want to perform this task." Replacing the camshafts (there are 2) is not an inexpensive task), but there are other alternatives if engine repair/replacement are necessary. Replacing your current engine with a "Japanese Domestic Market" engine (used engine from japan) is a good value alternative. Their emissions laws are far stricter than ours, and cars are recycled with much lower mileage than in the U.S., and reputable importers of these engines are available. Another alternative, if the engine does not have other bad behavior than the ticking noise, is to simply continue to drive it, and turn up the radio. It comes down to a cost/benefit decision. I would have another mechanic inspect the noise to give you their assessment of the situation before deciding on a costly repair like this.

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