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Q: Squealing

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Hi! My name is Edgar I just had a question about my brakes. While I'm driving my car does a bit of squealing, but more so when I'm braking. and from my understanding it's coming from my cars front passenger side. (My right while driving) Would this be something of a belt or a brake issue????? An help would be great thanks!

A: It sounds like it could be your brakes; how...

It sounds like it could be your brakes; however, it could be a belt. I have seen issues where the belt won’t make noise until you let off the gas. I will give you some steps to go through to make sure it’s not your brakes.

  1. On the passenger side, look at your rotor and see if it has any rough marks at all. If you do see rough marks, from over heating, uneven wear, or an excessive amount of rust, there is no need to investigate further: you will need your front brakes replaced.

  2. If you can, jack up your car. Note: Put a block behind your rear tires before you do this for your safety.

  3. Take off the tire.

  4. Look at the thickness of the brake pads. If they are less than 12 millimeters of thickness you will need to replace your pads and rotors.

  5. Look on the back of the rotor.

To inspect your serpentine belt, simply have the vehicle on and open the hood. If you hear a squealing sound, turn your engine off and look at the belt. If you see a lot of cracks in your belt, then you’ll need to replace your serpentine belt. Also, look around the area for possibilities of wetness where oil may have dripped or a leaking brake line.

I recommend having a certified technician, such as one from YourMechanic, come to your home or business and inspect the brakes to determine the best course of action.

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