How to Replace a Belt in Your Car

When your engine is running, it creates power that is used for more than just accelerating. The engine’s power turns a belt on the front of the engine that can power additional systems such as:

  • The air conditioning compressor
  • The air pump
  • The alternator
  • The power steering pump
  • The water pump

Some vehicles have more than one belt to operate additional components while others have an alternate means of powering systems. Each vehicle model is unique in what that drive belt operates.

Engine drive belts are made of reinforced rubber. Rubber is used to manufacture belts because:

  • Rubber is flexible even in cold weather.
  • Rubber is inexpensive for manufacturing.
  • Rubber is non-slip.

If the belt was completely made of rubber, it would stretch or break under just a bit of stress. It is reinforced with fibers to retain its shape and to strengthen it, preventing it from stretching. The fibers can be cotton strands or even kevlar strands that add enough strength to stop the belt from losing its shape and stretching.

Because belts are made of rubber, they are subject to wear and weathering. As your engine runs, the belt goes around on the pulleys several hundred times per minute. The rubber can heat up and slowly wear off the belt. It can also dry out and crack from heat or from lack of use and can eventually snap.

If your belt breaks, you can experience drivability problems like a lack of power steering, no power brake assist, your battery won’t charge, or your engine could overheat. You should change the engine drive belt at the first sign of excessive wear, cracking, or fraying. Some small cracking is considered normal wear on the rib side and crack should not go to the bottom of the rib or it is considered excessive and should be replaced.

Part 1 of 4: Select a new serpentine belt

It is absolutely crucial that your new belt is the same size and style as the one on your vehicle currently. If it is not, you will not be able to operate your car until you get the proper belt.

Step 1: Check part listings at an auto parts store. In the belt aisle, there will be a book that indicates the correct belt for nearly all modern vehicles.

  • Find the correct belt on the shelf and purchase it. Be aware of optional belts for different accessories on your vehicle.

Step 2: Ask a parts professional. Ask an employee at the parts counter to locate the correct belt for your vehicle. Confirm the model, year, and options if they are requested. The engine size and any options may be needed to get the correct belt.

hand holding timing belt showing ID

Step 3: Check the belt. If you cannot find a listing for your belt, check on the belt itself. Sometimes there will be legible part numbers or belt identifiers on the belt even after years of use. Match that number up with one at the auto parts store.

Old belt next to new one matching

Step 4: Physically match the belt up. If none of the other options are successful, remove the belt and bring it into an auto parts store. Match it up physically with a new belt by trial and error.

  • Ensure it has the exact same number of ribs, is the same width, and the same length. The length of the new belt may be just a small amount shorter than the worn belt due to the old belt may be stretched out.

  • Ask a parts professional to help if you are uncertain of the process.

Part 2 of 4: Remove the serpentine belt

Modern cars almost all use a single belt that operates all the accessory devices on your engine. It is routed in a bit of a complex manner and is held in place with tension. A serpentine belt is a flat, reinforced rubber belt that has several small grooves in it on one side, and a smooth backside. The grooves match up with protrusions in some of the pulleys on your engine while the backside of the belt runs along smooth surfaces on idler pulleys and tensioners. There are a few engines that use a belt with grooves on the inside and outside of the belt.

Materials Needed

  • Belt
  • Eye protection
  • Gloves
  • Pen and paper
  • Ratchet and socket set (⅜”)

  • Warning: Always wear gloves and eye protection when working under the hood of your car.

belt routing edentification diagram

Step 1: Identify the belt routing. Check under the hood for a label that shows the correct routing of your engine belt.

  • If there is no label for belt routing, draw the pulleys and the belt routing with your pen and paper.

  • Warning: It is crucial that your new belt is installed in the exact same fashion as the old belt or you can cause serious damage to your engine or other components.

Step 2: Release the belt tension. There are a few different styles of tensioners for serpentine belts. Most new vehicles use a spring-loaded tensioner while others have a screw-style adjustable tensioner.

Step 3: Use ratchet to release tension. If your tensioner is spring-loaded, use your ratchet set to release the tension.

  • You may need to put a socket on the ratchet to put it on the tensioner pulley bolt. Another style requires just the square ⅜” or 1/2" drive on the ratchet to be inserted into a hole on the tensioner.

  • Pry in the direction opposite the belt to release tension. Be careful not to get your fingers caught in the belt while removing the belt.

Step 4: Match the socket. If your tensioner is adjustable with a screw-style adjuster, match up the correct socket to the adjuster bolt and install it on your ratchet.

Step 5: Loosen the tensioner adjustment bolt. Turn the ratchet in a counterclockwise direction until the belt loosens and you can pull it off the pulleys by hand.

person removing old belt

Step 6: Take the old belt off. While you are still holding the tensioner with one hand on the ratchet, slide the belt off one or more pulleys with your free hand.

Step 7: Release the tensioner. Slowly and in a controlled manner, ease the tensioner pulley back to a resting position with the ratchet if your tensioner is spring loaded. If you release tensioner too fast or slip off and it slams to stop it may damage the tensioner and would need to be replaced.

Part 3 of 4: Inspect the pulleys

Step 1: Pull the old belt off the rest of the pulleys. Compare its length and width with the new belt you have to install to make sure it is correct.

  • The belt width and number of ribs needs to be exact and the length needs to be very close. The old belt may have stretched a bit while in use so it may be slightly longer than the new one by an inch or less.

Step 2: Inspect the condition of the pulleys. Look for missing pieces of the metal pulleys, check for bends, and spin each pulley to make sure they aren’t noisy or seized.

  • Make sure the pulleys are lined up. Look from one side to see if any pulleys are noticeably set further back or protruding forward.

  • If they don’t spin smoothly or are out of alignment, you need to address the issue before installing a new belt. A damaged pulley or seized component will quickly throw off or destroy a new belt.

Part 4 of 4: Install the new serpentine belt

loosely place new belt around pulley

Step 1: Install the new belt loosely. Route the new belt over as many pulleys as you can. If possible, install the belt onto every pulley aside from the tensioner.

  • Verify that the smooth backside of the belt only contacts the smooth pulleys and the grooved side only contacts the toothed pulleys.

Step 2: Apply pressure to the tensioner. Apply pressure to the tensioner with your ratchet if your tensioner is spring-loaded.

  • Pull it as far back as you can manage. It will likely need to be extended a little further than the old belt as the new one is stiffer and hasn’t stretched out.

person pulling tensioner back while sliding in belt

Step 3: Slide the belt onto the tensioner with your free hand.

  • If you weren’t able to completely route the belt before this step, do so with the tensioner pressure released.

Step 4: Slowly release your pressure on the tensioner. Keep your hands clear in case the belt slips off or snaps back in your direction.

  • Check all pulleys to make sure the belt has engaged all ribs properly.

Step 5: Tighten the adjustable tensioner. If your tensioner has a screw-style adjuster, tighten it with the ratchet until the belt is taut between all the pulleys.

pressing down on belt

Step 6: Check the belt deflection. Press on the longest belt run between pulleys to make sure it is tight. You should only be able to manage about a half-inch of deflection.

  • If you have more deflection than a half-inch to an inch, your belt tensioner is weak and needs to be replaced. Do so before you run your engine. If you have an adjustable tensioner then re-adjust the belt tighter till the deflection is a half-inch.

Step 7: Start your engine and watch the belt turning. Watch the belt for a minute or two, confirming that there is no squealing noises, grinding noises, or smoking from the belt.

  • If there are any irregularities, shut the engine off immediately and check your belt routing. If the belt routing is correct, you may have another mechanical issue which you should have looked at by a certified mechanic such as YourMechanic.

  • Re-check belt tension after running the engine for a couple of minutes to make sure the belt's initial stretch does not require re-adjustment.

If you don't have the time or wish to have a professional perform this repair for you, consider having a certified mobile mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, help you replace your drive belt.


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Andrian

32 years of experience
184 reviews
Andrian
32 years of experience
Mercedes-Benz S550 - Serpentine/Drive Belt - Hollywood, Florida
Adrian is the Best! Should call him big smooth. He came out and got the job done. He was also quick and did everything i request. Master Mechanic!!! Would defintley recommend for Mercedes s550 or any car. This guy knows his stuff. J.L (Mercedes S-550)
Hyundai Tiburon - Serpentine/Drive Belt - Hollywood, Florida
Adrian was extremely professional and courteous. He took care of everything quickly and was a pleasure to work with

Adam

17 years of experience
88 reviews
Adam
17 years of experience
Buick Rendezvous - Serpentine/Drive Belt - Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Car repairs can be stressful and confusing, Adam explanations and recommendations were very professional.
Jeep Wrangler - Serpentine/Drive Belt - West Palm Beach, Florida
Adam was knowledgeable, courteous, and professional. The overheating issue w/ my Jeep has been corrected.

Christopher

10 years of experience
73 reviews
Christopher
10 years of experience
Toyota Corolla - Serpentine/Drive Belt - Cypress, Texas
Christopher was here for about 2 hours and he did quite a bit of work. The worksite was left clean, which was much to my liking. He had to change out the transmission oil and engine oil in my Mother's car. Who would have known that you could have this done in your own garage, with no mess or hassle.
Jeep Wrangler - Serpentine/Drive Belt - Katy, Texas
Chris really went out of his way to get my Jeep back on the road. He had to order a part and even though the scheduling system had me waiting almost a week for him to return, he actually showed up the next day! Great service, great communication!

Jonathan

26 years of experience
26 reviews
Jonathan
26 years of experience
Hyundai Sonata - Serpentine/Drive Belt - Marietta, Georgia
Ward showed up on time and completed an overly complicated (Due to design and engine room workspace) drive belt swap out on my Hyundai Sonata in a reasonable amount of time.He answered all questions I had well,even about auto repair issues not necessarily related to the drive belt.Thanks to Ward and his young son helper for coming out in the early evening darkness (Equipped with headband flashlight) to do this job.
Hyundai Genesis - Serpentine/Drive Belt - Roswell, Georgia
Diagnose the problem and came back the next day to replaced my alternator. I did not have to leave the house.

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