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Q: Cam Position Actuator problem - 1999 Volvo S80

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Hello, I just bought a 1999 Volvo s80 turbo which needs a CVVT or VVT (IM NOT SURE WHICH) and i was running it and then i went to leave and now the car will not start at all. I was wondering if we could replace the VVT on my car by ourselves because no one in a 50 mile radius works on this kind of car. How much does the part cost? How much to replace it? Where can I get it done? Is it the CVVT or VVT? I really need my car. I really need help please!!!

My car has 102352 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

A: Hello I believe you are referring to the va...

Hello I believe you are referring to the variable valve timing or camshaft position actuator/solenoid, which varies the camshaft timing relative to the crankshaft position. This feature enhances engine performance, mileage, and lowers emissions. If you are able to get the problem codes causing the Check Engine light to illuminate, that could confirm whether the variable valve timing actuator is the problem, or the timing chain, guides, tensioner and chain are worn or stretched - causing related symptoms. Given your mileage, if either of these components are the problem source, I would recommend doing both a timing chain service, and a variable valve timing actuator/solenoid service. These are tightly integrated components, and wear out at similar mileage. A mobile, professional mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, will come to your location, and repair this problem, getting you back on the road.

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