Q: it doesn't want to go forward but when i put it in to gear it goes into gear with no problem

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When i go forward it jumps and also makes a loud poping noise

My car has 128000 miles.

A: This really sounds like something has broke...

This really sounds like something has broken inside your transmission, but could be a problem with the drive axle. Transmission failures are not uncommon with this Ford powertrain. The failure is not unusual for a Ford Fusion with this kind of milage. But before you go replacing the transmission, you should rule out the drive axle.

This vehicle does come with an all wheel drive option. If your Fusion is all wheel drive, there are more axles to check and a transfer case that can also be the issue. What I am about to describe can be hard to do without a car rack that all four wheels sit on, opposed to lifting the vehicle by the frame. Diagnosing drive train failures often comes down to the experience of the technician working on your car. In other words, once we see and hear a specific type of failure, we use that as reference to diagnose the next car that exhibits the same symptoms. In this case we pay close attention to the sound made and the general location it is coming from when it jumps and pops forward.

From your description, I suspect it is an axle failure. The drive axles on your car are of the CV (Constant Velocity) joint type. They don't usually fail suddenly. There is usually a ripped or torn CV boot or a specific event that leads to their demise. They can pop and jump as they try to move the vehicle forward. With a complete failure you will hear a more consistent grinding noise. Differentials, transfer cases and transmission can do the same, but the sound will be of a higher frequency usually and they don't commonly pop and jump. Pinpointing the location of the popping can be done while accelerating from a stop, or just driving slowly, which ever your car will do, while another person walks around the car to get an idea where the sound is coming from. This can be dangerous for obvious reasons, so use your best judgment.

If it is a drive axle, it will be louder at one wheel. This will be the wheel that the failed axle drives. From there it is usually fairly simple to find the problem. But if the sound comes from a more central part of the car, pay attention to where it is coming from front to back. If it is in a central location like directly under the windshield, this points to a transmission problem. The front wheel drive transmission houses the transmission and the front differential. If the sound is further back, in the case of an all wheel drive vehicle, the suspected component will be the transfer case. If it is an all wheel drive vehicle, and the sound comes from the rear of the car, the rear drive line and differential could be the problem.

Locating where the sound is coming from is the primary goal here. Anytime a drive system exhibits symptoms like this, it is a pretty sure sign something has broken inside the unit, in which case it will need to removed and rebuilt. A certified mobile mechanic from YourMechanic can attempt to diagnose the source of the noise at your home or office.

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