Q: Ignition module

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My car is sputtering and shaking check engine light is flashing. I got it diagnosed as ignition module bought new one and it’s still not working. I’ve bought 4 new ignition modules in the past 4 months and for some reason new ones won’t work,but a used one will for a certain amount of time? Is there something I’m missing? Please help!

My car has 145000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

A flashing check engine light typically signifies a misfire. Misfiring will ruin the catalytic converter so do try to get this resolved promptly or don’t use the car until the problem is resolved to avoid further damage. If a new ignition module does not resolve the misfiring then either there are additional causes of the misfiring or there was nothing wrong with the module. If you request a diagnostic, the first thing the mechanic would have to determine is if the misfiring is confined to specific cylinders or if it is random. Secondary firing patterns can be scoped to determine if the misfiring is global (random), or isolated to just a few cylinders, and if the issue is fuel or ignition related.That will help narrrow the potential causes. Misfiring can be due to engine mechanical faults such as sticking valves and low compression. Cylinder compression should be tested to see if the engine is basically mechanically sound. If the engine is mechanically sound and you have random misfiring, look for obvious things like EGR system malfunctions, vacuum leaks, and so forth. Cylinder specific misfiring can be due to faulty fuel injectors. If you want the required diagnostic steps performed by a certified Mechanic, dispatched by YourMechanic right to your location, please request a misfiring diagnostic and the responding certified mechanic will get this diagnosed and resolved for you. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic.

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