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Q: How to replace the timing belt and camshaft

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I had to replace my water pump so I had to take off all of the timing belt and cam shafts to get to the water pump when I took off the camshaft the markings that say up was facing down when replacing it am i supposed to adjust it or do I just replace it back the same way I took it off

My car has 120000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

A: Ideally, you should have aligned the marks ...

Ideally, you should have aligned the marks before you removed the timing belt. It sounds as though everything is completely disassembled already. This makes things a bit more difficult. I would only recommend assembling it the same way as you took it apart if you have marked the camshaft pulleys and the crank pulley in the exact spot they are in before you removed the timing belt.

If you haven’t done this, I suggest aligning the marks per the repair manual. The reason for this, which you will need to address when assembling with the marks aligned as well, is it is very easy to be a tooth off. Timing marks rarely align perfectly. There is always a margin of error. To describe it in better detail, often times you will need to decide to align a mark just above or below the mark that it is aligning with. You won’t be able to align them exactly. Aligning these marks before you remove the belt will allow you to take note of where the mark should be. Since you don’t know this for sure, you will likely be guessing.

I’ve looked up the alignment on my information system. It will be more accurate than your typical store bought repair manual. The good news, but take this information with a grain of salt, because information is often incorrect, no matter the source, my information system states the exhaust camshaft sprocket mark should be a half tooth below the intake camshaft mark. I have worked on quite a few of these and this should be correct. But as I stated before, I rely on what I observe at the time of disassembly before I look up timing mark alignment.

The exhaust camshaft is the camshaft gear toward the rear of the car.

In your case, go with this information. You don’t really have a choice.

If you should still need help with this, I recommend the following service; Timing belt to address this situation.

Good luck!

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