Q: How do you remove and reinstall head restraints?

asked by on December 15, 2015

How do you remove and reinstall head restraints?

Your car’s head restraints serve and important purpose in providing better comfort, but also in ensuring safety during an impact. Of course, there may come a time that you need to remove them (and reinstall them when you’re done). Here’s what you need to do:

  1. Pull the head restraint all the way up.
  2. Press both the Unlock button and the lock release button (one on each shaft).
  3. Pull the head restraint out of the seat back.
  4. Store the head restraint somewhere safe.

To reinstall:

  1. Insert both shafts into their holes (make sure the head restraint is facing the right way).
  2. Slide the head restraint down until you feel the locks activate.
  3. Adjust it to the height of the person in the seat.

Tips

  • Never ride without the head restraints in place unless absolutely necessary.

  • For the right adjustment, make sure the top of the head restraint is even with the top of the person’s head.

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