Q: Engine code after repair

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I'm getting the code for the coolant thermostat sensor. It was replaced within the last year. New thermostat sensor housing. The light came on now and the fan in front of the radiator is running high and loud most of the time. It is not overheating at all to my knowledge I drove it about 4 1/2 hours from where I purchased it and the temp stayed dead center. I drove about 85 in 6th gear most of the way. I was told to get the whole housing again but do not want to do so if there could be a different problem

My car has 139300 miles.
My car has a manual transmission.

If the sensor is defective then the sensor can be replaced without replacing the entire housing again. The sensor will need to be checked with a scan tool to see if its giving the correct readings by comparing the data reading to actual coolant temperature measured with a thermometer and the temperature according to the gauge. Once the sensor is identified as having a problem then it can be replaced. Just because it was replaced recently doesn’t mean it can’t go bad again. If you paid to have it replaced recently then it may be under some parts warranty. If it was done by the old owner, then you will likely have to pay someone to do it again. You can save some money by having a qualified technician, such as one from YourMechanic, come to your home or work and diagnose your check engine light.

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