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Q: Do i have to change my shocks and struts to get lowering springs, or can i just get the lowering springs?

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Do i have to change my shocks and struts to get lowering springs, or can i just get the lowering springs?

My car has 124000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

A: It is generally recommended that you change...

It is generally recommended that you change the shocks/struts when you use lowering springs. Your stock shocks and struts are designed to operate up and down in the range the stock springs provide. Lowering springs are shorter than stock springs so the shocks and struts wind up in a new normal position that is more like the middle of their travel when used with stock springs. The ride will not be as well controlled as with using shocks and struts designed to operate with lowering springs. Theoretically you can leave the stock shocks and struts in place with lowering springs but they will not last very long, especially if at 124,000 miles, yours are original. I suggest having your cars suspension system diagnosed by a certified technician, like one from YourMechanic. They'll be able to check out these components firsthand and help you adjust your suspension from there. Good luck.

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