Q: Cooling fan won't stop running.

asked by on

I have a coolant leak. I recently replaced the thermostat and had a mechanic replace the gasket. The cooling fan is constantly running.

Hi there. The cooling system can leak from so many different spots that it can be hard to diagnose. If the problem occurred right after the thermostat and gasket were replaced then the work may not have be performed properly. If this was occurring prior to the parts being replaced then the leak may be from someplace else. If you cannot see the leak visually then a more in depth inspection must be done. A mechanic would opt for either a pressure test or a dye test to find the source of the leak. As for the fan running all of the time, this can occur if the coolant level is low or if the engine is overheating. The coolant leak should be located first and repaired to see if the fan begins working properly. Getting some help from a certified mechanic, like one from YourMechanic, who had a cooling system pressure tester can make this a lot easier.

Was this answer helpful?
The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
  1. Home
  2. Questions
  3. Cooling fan won't stop running.

Get an instant quote for your car

Our certified mechanics come to you ・Backed by 12-month, 12,000-mile guarantee・Fair and transparent pricing

Get a quote

What others are asking

Q: How do you tilt the steering wheel?

Your car is equipped with a tilt steering feature that lets you adjust the angle of the steering wheel. This provides you with the means to customize your driving position for your height and other preferences. Here’s how to do...

Q: Heat in car is not hot

This may suggest the thermostat might be stuck open or you may have a clogged heater core. As you know, if the thermostat is stuck open, the coolant circulates constantly never allowing the motor to fully warm up and therefore...

Q: Clunking when shifting - 2001 Jeep Cherokee

The "clunk" indicates there is a loose coupling somewhere is the driveline. As you diagnosed, u-joints and the differential are the most likely fault points, but this could also be harsh engagement of the transmission due to worn clutches, clutch...

Related articles

What Causes Hoses to Leak?
While the largest part of your engine is mechanical, hydraulics plays a significant role. You’ll find fluids at work in a number of different areas. Your car's fluids include: Engine oil Transmission...
How Long Does a Heater Control Valve Last?
Keeping the right amount of coolant in a car is essential in keeping the engine at the right temperature. Failing to have the right amount of coolant or even bad elements...
P0240 OBD-II Trouble Code: Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance
P0240 code definition Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance What the P0240 code means P0240 is an OBD-II generic code triggered when the Engine Control Module (ECM) detects the intake boost...