Q: Code P0222

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Jaguar x-type engine was recently changed. It's not starting well. I have to remove the adapter on the throttle sensor, once started reconnect. The car is not also accelerating , and I'm getting P0222 , P0118 and P0112. Also want to know if I replace the throttle/pedal position sensor or the throttle body, will I need to program it to the computer?

My car has 121000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

If you replace the TPS sensor on the throttle body, you do not require reprogramming. I would still disconnect the battery for at least thirty minutes to reset the computer.

What concerns me are the other two codes. Unless the ECT (coolant temp) or MAF/IAT (mass air flow / intake air temperature) sensor are bad or unplugged, then you will still have fuel issues which could result in the engine not starting or performing properly.

After looking at the wiring diagram, the TPS, ECT, and IAT sensors have one thing in common. They all share a black wire with a dark green stripe which runs to a wire splice junction in the wiring harness. From the splice it then runs to the computer. This wire acts as a reference ground for the sensors and should read as a ground. If there is damage or corrosion to this splice (which has a lot of wires running to it), then all three sensors would not read correctly and set check engine codes. Also if a ground to the computer is not secure then it will also cause problems with the circuit.

The grounds of the computer (black wires) run to the right fender wheel well. Ensure there is no corrosion or loose wires at that bolting point. I am uncertain exactly at this moment where in the wiring harness the splices are located.

I personally would check the grounds first at both the fender well and at the sensors before replacing parts. Or you could just throw a TPS sensor on it to see if it helps.

If this doesn’t fix the vehicle, then I would suggest having a qualified technician, such as one available from YourMechanic, perform a complete diagnostic inspection of the check engine light. They should then be able to recommend an appropriate repair.

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