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Q: Change my timing chain. Got it on time from upper to lower chain tensioners and now I have no spark.

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I've decided to put a new timing chain in my car it's almost at 300,000 miles I noticed a grinding noise inside my engine bay so I had to go look into it I found the problem and it turned out to be my timing chain on the top when I took it off I put the new one back on with new guys and new tensioner I connected everything back together and now I have no spark I don't know what the issue is all the connectors are connected I'm not getting any codes from my Alltel scan tool I don't know what the problem is I've checked wires I check grounds I've checked for broken wires nothing I don't get it

My car has 285000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Hey there. I would recommend checking the camshaft position sensor as this sensor is located near the timing components, to be sure that it is plugged in correctly and working properly. I would also suggest checking the crankshaft position sensor just to be sure it is also plugged in correctly.

As you know, both of these sensors will impact whether or not the motor will produce spark. If either of these are not the problem, you may want to then begin testing the ignition coils for power to be sure they are providing current to the spark plug wires. If you would like to have a professional scope this out for you, a certified technician from YourMechanic can come to your car’s location to inspect the issue getting spark.

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