Q: Q: Brakes

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I'm trying to see if there could be something else wrong with my truck besides the air in the lines. My truck wouldn't stop so I had new brakes and rotors put on my truck. The truck still wouldn't stop. Every time I press the brakes you could hear the air in them and they went all the way down to the floor. I was told to have someone bleed the brakes. The first time he tried he noticed that when you press the brakes, brake fluid poured out & when not pressing it was just a small leak. He tighten up the hose, & tried again... The more air they tried to pump out, the more air was going back in.... Is there a possibility that something else could be wrong or it's gonna take more manpower than somebody pressing the brakes to fix the problem?
My car has an automatic transmission.

There are several places where a malfunction can cause air to enter the hydraulic brake system. Of course, air can enter through a ruptured hose or brake line, but it can also enter through a faulty master cylinder, anti-lock brake module (if equipped), a faulty caliper or wheel cylinder, or a power brake booster. The latter possibilities are typically less common, but are a possibility. Finding these issues can take some advanced techniques to locate. Such as, if the reservoir loses fluid, and there doesn’t appear to be any leaks, the fluid may be leaking into the power brake booster, from the master cylinder. This is just an example, but this type of situation would make me look towards the master cylinder as the issue. Without doing some diagnostics, it would be impossible to pinpoint the faulty component. If this is something you feel you could use a hand to identify and repair, consult a certified mechanic, like those available at YourMechanic.com.

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