Q: Why Do Timing Belts Have Teeth and How Do They Work?

asked by on November 30, 2015

Why do timing belts have teeth and how do they work?

Timing belts have teeth for a frictional contact point to the sprockets, which have teeth to match with the belt. The sprockets are located on the engine crankshaft and camshaft. The timing belt is rotated by the engine’s crankshaft which transfer the movement to a camshaft or shafts (model dependent) to open the valves in the cylinder head, in order to control the air/fuel mixture into the engine cylinder. There is a timing sequence that happens with the pistons and valves to make engine power. This belt keeps that relationship accurate. The timing belt can also rotate a coolant pump. There is a service requirement for the timing belt. When service is required on the belt, the coolant pump should be replaced also.

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