Skip the auto shop - Our mechanics make house calls

How Long Should the Belts in My Car Last?

Car belts

Automotive belts these days last quite a bit longer than they once did, thanks to better materials used in the manufacturing process. Just the same, they’re not going to last forever. So if you’re wondering, “How long should belts in a car last?” that’s a perfectly reasonable question. At some point, you will have to replace a belt, and ideally, you want to do it before it fails.

How long do car belts last?

In order to get an accurate assessment of how long your car belts are likely to last, you really should have a hands-on inspection done by a qualified mechanic, but you might be able to get a ball-park idea by providing the model, age, and mileage on your car. It would also be helpful if you know when the belt you’re concerned about was last replaced.

If you’re concerned about your belts, you can do a visual inspection. Some things, like cracks, fraying, chunks missing or visible glazing are proof that the belt needs to be replaced. Also, if a belt has been contaminated with oil or grease, it should definitely be replaced – the belt is going to deteriorate.

If your vehicle is equipped with v belts, they should be replaced within 3 years, or 40,000 miles. Beyond this point, car belt life will be dramatically reduced.

How often should belts be replaced?

Most cars today actually operate using a single belt, called a serpentine belt. Generally speaking, you should replace it every 3 years – more often if you notice wear or missing teeth – unless it’s made from EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer). This compound has been in use since 2005, and belts made from it are frequently found in newer vehicles. They’re usually good for 10 years or 150,000 miles. Even so, don’t neglect your car belt maintenance. It’s still a good idea to have a mechanic check the belt from time to time. Usually they’ll do this as a courtesy if you’re in for an oil change or other servicing.

Although replacement recommendations are usually based on years or mileage, the conditions your vehicle is subjected to can also affect the life of the belt. For instance, if you’re constantly driving through water, or if you live in an area where the weather is extreme (freezing in winter or in the triple digits in summer), this will lower the life expectancy of your belt.

So, make sure you maintain your belts properly, and replace when needed. The consequences of a broken belt can be expensive, and prevention is always preferable to repair.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
Icon-warranty_badge-02

Skip the repair shop, our top-rated mechanics come to you.

At your home or office

Choose from 600+ repair, maintenance & diagnostic services. Our top-rated mechanics bring all parts & tools to your location.

Fair & transparent pricing

See labor & parts costs upfront, so you can book with confidence.

12-month, 12,000-mile warranty

Our services are backed by a 12-month, 12,000-mile warranty for your peace of mind.

Get A Quote

Need Help With Your Car?

Our certified mobile mechanics make house calls in over 2,000 U.S. cities. Fast, free online quotes for your car repair.

GET A QUOTE

More related articles

Veteran and Military Driver Laws and Benefits in New Mexico
The state of New Mexico offers a number of benefits and perks for those Americans who have either served in an Armed Forces branch...
P2159 OBD-II Trouble Code: Vehicle Speed Sensor B Range/Performance
Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC): P2159 P2159 code definition Vehicle Speed Sensor B Range/Performance Related Trouble Codes: P2158: Vehicle Speed Sensor B P2160: Vehicle Speed Sensor B Circuit Low P2161:...
P2428 OBD-II Trouble Code: Exhaust Gas Temperature Too High Bank 1
P2428 code definition A P2428 trouble code signifies that the PCM has detected a problem in the exhaust gas temperature sensor circuit in bank 1, which subsequently contains the number one...


Related questions

Q: Belt rattling

If you are hearing a rattling sound from the belt area, it is likely coming from one of your pulleys or your belt tensioner. I would recommend having your engine and belt area inspected and listened to by a mechanic...

Q: Mitsubishi Endeavor overheating. Got waterpump and belt replaced less than a year ago what could it be

This may very well be a bad thermostat as this is often a common culprit of many overheating issues on most cars. The thermostat regulates the coolant flow in and out of your car's engine. When this is stuck open...

Q: what other 02 dodges has same belt tensioner as the caravan

Most of the Dodge 2.4 L engines share a lot of the same components (Sebring, Avenger, etc.) I would focus on the small- to mid-sized vehicles with a 2.4 L engine. I also recommend taking a photo of your...