Q: What should I know about turning traction control off?

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What should I know about turning traction control off?

The purpose of a vehicle’s traction control system is to assist drivers in maintaining stability and control of the vehicle during adverse weather conditions or when the vehicle is stopped abruptly.

There are electronic sensors in each wheel that provide information to the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) regarding the traction and stability of each wheel. In turn, the traction control system will reduce engine power and apply the brakes to specific wheels that may be slipping. Doing so allows the transfer of power from the wheel(s) that are slipping to the wheel(s) that are not. This provides drivers with the ability to maintain control of the vehicle. Even when the traction control system is engaged, it is still necessary for drivers to drive with caution when adverse weather conditions are present and when coming to a stop.

If the traction control system is disengaged, the safety features that it offers will be unavailable to the driver. The only time it may be necessary to turn the TCS off is when/if the vehicle is stuck in mud, snow or ice. Having the TCS on while the vehicle is stuck in mud, snow or ice may make it difficult to get the vehicle dislodged. The TCS engages automatically when the vehicle is turned on, therefore if it is turning the vehicle off and then turning it back on should turn the traction control system back on as well.

If you suspect that there may be an issue with your traction control system (TCS), contact a certified technician who can complete an inspection of the traction control system.

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