Q: Trying to test a sensor in the distributor that is allowing it to not spark.

asked by on February 03, 2017

The distributor wont send out sparks due to a sensor and I do not know how to test it

My car has 130000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

The Hall effect pick-up assembly in the distributor can be tested via the Factory Service Manual but that procedure has more than 15 steps. A more efficient test method is to use a self powered “indicator light” that is made just for this purpose. The indicator light will flash as the sensor’s output signal comes and goes, confirming proper operation. All that you need to do is plug the tester into the sensor and observe the indicator light as you crank the engine. The more common causes of failure in the ignition system should be excluded first and those are wiring faults and loose or corroded connectors. Consequently, be sure to check the entirety of the low voltage primary ignition circuit to the coil and/or the ignition control module. If you want these steps performed by a certified Mechanic, dispatched by YourMechanic right to your location, please request a distributor/ignition system diagnostic and the responding certified mechanic will get this resolved for you. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you.

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