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Q: There are minor electrical issues that fix themselves after turning the car off.

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There have been minor electrical issues with my car lately, usually after rain. The first time was 1 week ago when I rolled my window down, and instead of it automatically stopping a little over halfway down, it went all the way down. When I tried to roll it back up, it wouldn't roll up. So I turned the car off, waited 5 minutes while I looked up stuff pertaining to a non-rolling window, and when I turned the car back on the window rolled up and down again just fine. Then, today (10/29) I was leaving work and as I turned on my right blinker, it was blinking at double the speed (at least), so I pulled over and checked both blinkers. The back was not blinking and the front was blinking extremely fast. So I turned it off and got ready to change the bulb in the back before deciding to just head home first, and when I turned my car back on again after a few minutes the blinker was working just fine. Are these issues with the blinker/window themselves, or the electrical system as a whole?

My car has 41750 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

A: These types of problems are what we like to...

These types of problems are what we like to call intermittent problems where they may come and disappear before coming back again. The problem may be in the bulb or window itself, but they are controlled by switches where there is the possibility of another fault. Have the bulb pulled out and inspected. If it looks old and burned, have it replaced as well as all of the other turn signal bulbs. An experienced technician can gain access to the window electronics and test the power coming from the switch to the window. If power comes from the switch to the window and it does not work. the problem is the window motor. Consider hiring an experienced technician like one from YourMechanic to carry out these electrical checks for you and offer a personal diagnosis.

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