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Q: Possible exhaust manifold leak

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This morning on my way to work my truck began making a loud exhaust noise. It does not sound like a leak in the actual exhaust line. It sounds more high pitched, and it is coming from the engine compartment. Also, it sounds like it is originating from the drivers side only. I am no expert but I have a suspicion its an exhaust manifold leak. I was unable to visually inspect it today because it was too dark.

Is there anything else with similar symptoms or any way to confirm its the exhaust manifold?

-Travis

My car has 275000 miles.
My car has a manual transmission.

A: Hello and thank you for contacting YourMech...

Hello and thank you for contacting YourMechanic. The exhaust manifold will make a hissing sound or a ticking sound depending on the leak and how many leaks there are. If possible, get a broom stick and put it against the exhaust manifold and put the other end on your ear. Listen for the loud tick or hissing noise that will transfer through the stick if you are unsure where it is coming from. A lot of the time, the donuts that are in a wide pipe that connect to the exhaust manifold will burn through making the same sound. Check the connections to the wide pipe and check all of the exhaust gaskets for leaks. Replace the gaskets that are burned through. It is hard on the exhaust valves to leave a gasket burned on the exhaust manifolds. If you need assistance finding the exhaust leak, then seek out a professional, like one from YourMechanic, to inspect the vehicle and replace the exhaust manifold as necessary.

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