Skip the auto shop - Our mechanics make house calls

Q: Noisy bearings in the water pump that has no leaks

asked by on

What causes noise bearings in the water pump that doesn't leak? What is the average lifetime of the car's water pump in miles?

The bearings inside of the water pump are sealed from the outside air by a rubber seal. They are also sealed from the inside water by a rubber seal. If they weren’t, the water would get on the bearing and then rust and fall apart. So the reason they make noise is because, generally, if it happens too soon, it is just a cheaply manufactured water pump.

I’ve had Toyotas that have gone 200,000 miles and still had the original water pump. Also, I’ve seen cars like Chrysler that have had water pump wear out after 40-50,000 miles. Most of it has to do with the design of the engine.

Now, of course, you’d want to change the antifreeze regularly like you are supposed to. When I was a kid, that was every 3 years or every 36,000 miles because it wasn’t that good. It was the old green stuff. But today, they have a long-life antifreeze. Some of it is 7 years or 150,000 miles.

So buy the longest extended life antifreeze as you can. That way, when you change it, you don’t have to worry about the water pump going out because you are not getting dirty fluid that gets under seal, which then eats the seal off and the coolant gets into the bearings and eats them up. There is no average life time, because there are so many different designs out there, but if you take care of them like that, you are going to get the most lifetime you can.

If the noise gets progressively worse, you may want to have the sound inspected and diagnosed by a certified mechanic. A technician from YourMechanic can come to your car’s location to listen to the sound and let you know what needs to be done.

Was this answer helpful?

Need advice from certified mechanic? Get help now!

Over 1000 mechanics are ready to answer your question.
The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

Get an instant quote for your car

Our certified mechanics come to you ・Backed by 12-month, 12,000-mile guarantee・Fair and transparent pricing

Get a quote

What others are asking

Q: Keep burning out ac clutches

The clutch is burning up due to slip of the clutch overheating the clutch and melting the rubber. The reason it is slipping is the compressor locking up at the higher RPMs. You will need to reclaim the A/C refrigerant...

Q: Regrease the bearing on front & back axles

The front and rear hub bearings are not serviceable and will need to be replaced when they are bad. You can determine they are going bad when you notice a noise that sounds like driving on a road that is...

Q: Starter makes a 'clunk' noise

Hi there! It's likely that there is a ground connection compromised, loose, corroded, or power shortage. If the starter, battery, and the alternator are testing out to be fine then I suggest looking towards the connections and wiring. Start with...

Related articles

P2428 OBD-II Trouble Code: Exhaust Gas Temperature Too High Bank 1
P2428 code definition A P2428 trouble code signifies that the PCM has detected a problem in the exhaust gas temperature sensor circuit in bank 1, which subsequently contains the number one...
How Much Does a Mechanic Make in Vermont?
Automotive technician jobs in Vermont have an average mechanic salary of $37k, with some mechanics earning a salary of $53k.
P2103 OBD-II Trouble Code: Throttle Actuator Control Motor Circuit High
P2103 means there is a fault with the throttle actuator control motor circuit, likely due to a defective electrical component or part.