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Q: Just replaced faulty starter and one week later it won't work again

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One week ago I had been running errands all day with no problems and went to pick my boyfriend up from work and my car would not start. Just make two clicks when I turned the key but the radio and headlights came on just fine. We were able to make the car start by hitting the rounded end of the starter while someone turned the key. We got a new starter from a local pick and pull, replaced it and drove with no issues for a week. Today we drove to the gas station with no problems but after getting gas the car won't start again and is making the same clicking noises. What could blow a starter out so quick? Or is it something else entirely?

My car has 260000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

A: If you got a used starter then that starter...

If you got a used starter then that starter may have the same problem that your original starter had. This is common with used parts. I would make sure you are getting power to the main big terminal to the starter continuously and power to the little terminal when the key is turned to try and start it. If you get power to both when you test them then the starter is at fault. If not, then the system will need further testing by a mechanic in person.

If you need some assistance with these checks, consider enlisting a qualified mobile mechanic who can come to you and diagnose your starting issue firsthand and make the necessary repairs to your vehicle.

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