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Q: Issue with AC after timing chain replacement?

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I recently had my timing chain replaced on my 2010 GMC Acadia. Immediately after picking it up from the dealership for this repair, hot air was blowing out of the passenger vents when the temperature was set to 68 degrees. Air was appropriate temperature on driver side. I took it to local mechanic that evening and he pulled a B0423-04 code ("Temperature Control 2 Feedback Circuit Open"). I took it back to the dealership and they claimed this could not have been a result of the timing chain repair because all of their work was done under the hood and was not near the AC. I asked if perhaps when it got detailed, something could have been messed up. Again, they denied it was their fault. I was charged $245 to replace the passenger temperature actuator. Could this AC issue been caused by the timing chain repair (and associated disconnections/reconnections of wires related to the repair) or was it a huge coincidence that this broke while sitting at the dealership awaiting repair?

A: The timing chain and A/C components are not...

The timing chain and A/C components are not directly related, however that is not to say any of the work done could not have somehow affected the performance of the A/C. It is a little odd that the temp actuator is what actually went out as this would have absolutely no impact on anything related to the timing chain. If that was the only issue related to the A/C problem, then that would suggest that this was purely coincidence. It is not common, however the modern day vehicles are fairly complicated machines. If you'd like a second opinion on this, consider having one of our mobile technician come to you to diagnose the A/C issue firsthand.

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