Q: I do not know where my brake booster vacuum line connects to my engine.

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I do not know where my brake booster vacuum line connects to my engine and I need to know this location and how to order the correct part.

My car has 106000 miles.
My car has a manual transmission.

The HHR comes with two different motor options, so this complicates my answer a bit. Either way, the best method is to follow the hose at the brake vacuum booster to where it connects on the motor. Even better, simply write down your VIN number, the year, make and model of your vehicle and head to the nearest dealer or parts store. With this information they will be able to get you the correct part.

Once you have the correct part in hand, you will be able to figure out which hose needs replacing and therefore the correct routing and where each end connects. If you were looking to purchase the hose from us, you would also need to have us replace it as well. I will have customer service contact you if this is the case.

Good luck!

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Hi. The easiest way to find were your brake booster vacuum line connects to the engine is to trace the vacuum lines from the brake booster to the engine. The vacuum line is usually connected to the upper intake near the back or either side of the intake. Another alternative is going to the dealerships parts department and they will have a diagram of the vacuum line and we’re it goes to the engine. More than likely the vacuum line will have to be purchased from the dealership to get the correct one.

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