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Q: Does traction control depend on catalytic converter functioning properly?

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Traction control won't work any more (slipping tires on wet pavement); mechanic replaced O2 sensor and problem returned; now they claim that the left catalytic converter must be replaced to make the traction work again. I know that this catalytic converter innards had been previously scraped out because it was causing trouble. It doesn't make sense to me that the traction would be directly tied to the catalytic converter.

My car has 170000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

You are right, the traction control system is not related in any way to the exhaust system (e.g., the catalytic converter) in the vehicle. Traction control involves wheel speed sensors, the ABS system, and electronic controllers. If there is a problem with the traction control system on your vehicle, it is likely that diagnostic trouble codes have been stored and those codes will provide the key clues to finding, and repairing, the fault in the system. A certified Mechanic, dispatched by YourMechanic right to your location, can perform a traction control system diagnostic and let you know of the required repairs. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you.

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