Q: Coolant leaking, engine might be messed up now

asked by on October 29, 2015

My 2006 Honda Civic was running fine up until a couple of days ago. I found a puddle of coolant under the car, so I checked under the hood but didn’t see anything leaking. I turned the car on to see if anything was different. The engine was making a really concerning rumbling and after a minute it was running so rough that I had to shut it off. I’m afraid that the engine might not start when I turn the key again and there seems to be coolant leaking from the engine itself! I really need help with this problem as my car is still below 100,000 miles and I can’t afford to trade it in for a new one yet!

You are correct in not wanting to start the car to avoid any further damage. It sounds like you might have coolant leaking into one of the cylinders due to an engine block failure, resulting in a misfire. What needs to be done is to remove the spark plugs and pressurize the cooling system, then have the system inspected under pressure to find the source of the leak. When the technician has determined the source of the leak, action and/or repair can be determined/performed. If the engine block is determined to be the source of the leak, it would be advisable you give Honda a call with your VIN number to see if your car is eligible for the warranty extension on the engine block. Back in late 2010, Honda issued warranty extension number 10-048 for an engine block failure that leaks coolant. To have your vehicle inspected, please contact YourMechanic and one of our certified mechanics will be happy to inspect your coolant system leak.

Was this answer helpful?
The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

Get an instant quote for your car

Our certified mechanics come to you ・Backed by 12-month, 12,000-mile guarantee・Fair and transparent pricing

Get a quote

What others are asking

Possible hole in muffler

An exhaust system noise accompanied by a strange smell could be an indication of the catalyst deteriorating in the catalytic converter. The exhaust system should be thoroughly inspected, and depending on the mileage, if it is indeed the catalytic converter,...

Engine problems.

Hello. From what you describe it would appear that your vehicle is experiencing some serious performance and maybe even mechanical issues. If you believe the noise is coming from your turbo area it may be possible that the turbo is...

My car will not start

The radio and no start condition could be two separate issues, or they could both be linked to the totally integrated power module (TIPM). This module is essentially a smart fuse box that supplies power to many of the vehicle's...

Related articles

How Long Does a Thermo Coolant Fan Switch Last?
There There are many hard-working parts in your vehicle but perhaps the hardest working part of all is your engine. With that said it's easy to understand why your engine heats up. Allowing it to overheat means you risk damaging...
The Best Used Cars to Buy If You Have 3 or More Kids
If If you have three or more kids, you could probably get by with a mid-size sedan if all you want to do is take them from Point A to Point B. Realistically, though, having kids means music lessons, athletics,...
How to Clean an Engine
As As cars get older, they tend to accumulate quite a bit of dirt and grime from those miles spent on roads and freeways. It does not help either that leftover fluids that had previously leaked from old repairs are...